: :inin Kyiv (EET)

Section: New Statesman (The United Kingdom)

      When Chinese influence fails
      Sep29

      When Chinese influence fails

      How the rise and fall of a Chinese corporate giant turned the Czech Republic against Beijing. In 2015, Chinese president Xi Jinping invited his Czech counterpart, the ostentatiously pro-China Milos Zeman, to a military parade in Beijing commemorating the end of the Second World War. Both leaders watched as thousands of troops from the elite units...

      Donald Trump’s taxes: will the $750 revelation matter?
      Sep29

      Donald Trump’s taxes: will the $750 revelation matter?

      Why a report releasing the President’s tax details might fail to land a blow to his re-election campaign. On Sunday, the New York Times published a story that had been kept from the American people for years: that of Donald Trump’s tax returns. When he ran for office in 2016, the president broke recent tradition by not releasing the...

      “Nobody feels it’s equal”: how Israel’s second lockdown is widening the religious-secular divide
      Sep24

      “Nobody feels it’s equal”: how Israel’s second lockdown is widening the religious-secular divide

      A lack of agreement over new Covid-19 restrictions indicates a lack of trust in the nation’s government. Having been one of the first countries to impose a second national lockdown, Israel has announced further restrictions today, after the country’s health ministry reported a record level of almost 7,000 new cases of Covid-19 the...

      The struggle for a democratic Ukraine goes on, 20 years after my father’s abduction
      Sep16

      The struggle for a democratic Ukraine goes on, 20 years after my father’s abduction

      The anti-corruption journalist Georgiy Gongadze was murdered two decades ago. Young Ukrainians must not give up his mission. Curiously my father, Georgiy Gongadze, an icon of Ukrainian journalism, was born not in Ukraine but in Tbilisi, the capital of Soviet Georgia, in 1969. In the early 1990s he became a youth activist, travelling through the...

      Bored of Covid rules, Russians are kicking back on the Black Sea
      Sep16

      Bored of Covid rules, Russians are kicking back on the Black Sea

      With little appetite to return to self-isolation, and social-distancing fatigue setting in, many in Russia now see the pandemic as a closed issue. Nothing typically happens in Russia in August. As a rule, the final month of summer is when the big cities empty out, their inhabitants making for their dachas or to seaside resorts, leaving their...

      Why the Internal Market Bill makes a no-deal Brexit much more likely
      Sep09

      Why the Internal Market Bill makes a no-deal Brexit much more likely

      A change to the Irish border protocol would not be a “limited” tweak to international law. How unusual is the government’s plan to break international law in a “specific and limited way” with the Internal Market Bill, and is the government really planning to do it? Those are the questions being raised in today’s papers, and by MPs,...

      US democracy in peril: will disinformation decide the 2020 election?
      Sep06

      US democracy in peril: will disinformation decide the 2020 election?

      Individuals will be the main line of defence against online misinformation. We will likely remember the 2020 US election as “the coronavirus election”: the campaign season when the usual pageantry of rallies, conventions and canvassing evaporated into the air we were all suddenly fearful to breathe. Instead, campaigning has been relegated to the...

      The politics of the spice rack: Russia’s love of dill
      Aug21

      The politics of the spice rack: Russia’s love of dill

      Each jar and packet in the kitchen is part of a wider story, involving geography, culture and politics. Let’s face facts: dill has a bad reputation. Lacking the romance of basil or the sophistication of rosemary, this sweet, pungent herb will be familiar to anyone who’s eaten a pickle, or maybe tried gravlax. In the West, its usage...

      The bully of Belarus: will Russia intervene to save Alexander Lukashenko?
      Aug19

      The bully of Belarus: will Russia intervene to save Alexander Lukashenko?

      Military intervention would turn most Belarusians against their larger neighbour – but the Kremlin could decide intervention to prop up its closest ally is worth the risk. Alexander Lukashenko, Belarus’s embattled dictator, never wanted to be a citizen of Belarus. The former chairman of a collective farm was the only member of the Supreme...

      From Belarus to Lebanon, the US to Thailand, righteous moral outrage is sweeping the globe
      Aug19

      From Belarus to Lebanon, the US to Thailand, righteous moral outrage is sweeping the globe

      Anger, it can seem, is everywhere. It spreads faster than ever. It is viral, but unlike coronavirus cannot be socially distanced into abeyance. Its roots are deep. Amid demonstrations over Belarus’s fraudulent election, President Alexander Lukashenko tried to bolster his position with a public appearance on 17 August. It did not go well....