: :inin Kyiv (EET)

Section: The American Interest (USA)

      Obama’s Failed Legacy in Afghanistan
      Feb15

      Obama’s Failed Legacy in Afghanistan

      Last year Foreign Affairs ran a special section on President Barack Obama’s foreign policy legacy. The section included essays on the Middle East, Africa, Latin America, terrorism, Europe, Asia, and a pair of dueling assessments of the Administration’s overall performance. Curiously, the entire section was almost entirely silent about...

      Follyanna? A Coda
      Feb13

      Follyanna? A Coda

      Less than 24 hours after finishing “Follyanna?” the U.S. government, along with other Western and Russian officials, announced a ceasefire in Syria, supposedly to be discussed and detailed further in preparation for implementation next week. Does this disprove my skepticism about the futility of the Geneva process? We’ll find out fairly...

      Predators on the Frontier
      Feb12

      Predators on the Frontier

      Revisionist powers are on the move. ‎From eastern Ukraine and the Persian Gulf to the South China Sea, large rivals of the United States are modernizing their military forces, grabbing strategic real estate, and threatening vulnerable U.S. allies. Their goal is not just to assert hegemony over their neighborhoods but to rearrange the global...

      Eastern Orthodox Cacophony in America
      Feb10

      Eastern Orthodox Cacophony in America

      On January 22-23 there took place a meeting (technically called a synaxis) of all Eastern Orthodox primates (presiding bishops or patriarchs in different parts of the world). The meeting took place at the Orthodox Center in Chambesy, near Geneva, and was presided over by Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, who (rather uncomfortably) resides in...

      Brussels Moves to Counter Gazprom
      Feb10

      Brussels Moves to Counter Gazprom

      It looks like Brussels is finally awakening to the strategic disadvantages of its heavy reliance on Russian energy supplies—specifically, its imports of natural gas from state-owned Gazprom. Of particular concern in recent years has been Gazprom’s ability to divide and conquer the bloc by selling its gas to different countries at different...

      A Fresh Blow to Ukraine’s Government
      Feb05

      A Fresh Blow to Ukraine’s Government

      One of Ukraine’s most-respected reformist ministers, Aivaras Abromavicius, resigned yesterday because, he said, the corruption of President Petro Poroshenko’s government had become too much. Over at Bloomberg View, Leonid Bershidsky reports: The unofficial view has been of Ukraine’s reformist ministers as the public faces of a...

      Will Gazprom Start a New Price War?
      Feb04

      Will Gazprom Start a New Price War?

      Russia’s state-owned natural gas company Gazprom for some time enjoyed the benefits of having a reliable market to its west. For years, Europe has depended heavily on overland imports from Gazprom, and Moscow has used that dependence as geopolitical and economic leverage, forcing its European customers to sign long-term take-or-pay...

      How the West Misjudged Russia, Part 4: Mad about Medvedev
      Feb03

      How the West Misjudged Russia, Part 4: Mad about Medvedev

      Editor’s Note: How do Russia and the West see one another? What are the experts’ views on the confrontation between Russia and the West? How do the pundits explain the Russo-Ukrainian war and Russia’s Syrian gambit? What are the roots of the mythology about Russia in the West, and why has the West failed to predict and...

      NATO Spending Still Shrinking
      Jan29

      NATO Spending Still Shrinking

      Despite the ongoing Russian occupation of eastern Ukraine and the conflicts in Syria and Libya that are driving millions of refugees into Europe, the European members of NATO still cut their defense spending overall last year. Reuters reports: NATO’s defence spending as a share of economic output fell 1.5 percent in 2015, the sixth straight...

      Betraying Magnitsky
      Jan28

      Betraying Magnitsky

      Last week, an official British inquiry concluded that the 2006 murder of the exiled Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko by polonium poisoning was ordered by the head of the FSB, “probably” with the approval of President Vladimir Putin. Despite the dramatic accusation, the report, by Sir Robert Owen, added little to what was already known—that a...